Stephen Hawking's Voice Has Been Blasted Into A Black Hole



Stephen Hawking's voice has been beamed into space as a "message of peace and hope" to the universe as his ashes were laid to rest on Friday. A speech from the late physicist was set to an original score by composer Vangelis, who wrote music for films including "Chariots of Fire" and "Blade Runner."


The European Space Agency beamed it from its satellite dish in Cebreros, Spain, to the nearest black hole, which is called 1A 0620-00. It is part of a binary star system 3,500 light years from earth.


The entire piece is about six and a half minutes long, with a voiceover by Hawking in the middle, European Space Agency senior adviser Mark McCaughrean told CNN. 


It isn't clear that exactly what the voiceover will say. The Vangelis piece will be played to the guests at the Friday's service, and be released to the public at an unspecified date, CNN reported.


Hawking's family, friends, and 1,000 members of the public attended a thanksgiving service at Westminster Abbey, London, which started at midday local time on Friday.



The service featured readings from people including actor Benedict Cumberbatch and astronaut Tim Peake.

At the service, Hawking's ashes were interred between fellow British scientists Sir Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin. A memorial stone with one of Hawking's most famous equations was also placed on top of his grave. Stephen hawking will always be remembered by the world as a great scientist.


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