Astronomers Admit: We Were Wrong—100 Billion Habitable Earth-Like Planets In Our Galaxy Alone


Estimates by astronomers indicate that there could be more than 100 BILLION Earth-like worlds in the Milky Way that could be home to life. Think that’s a big number? According to astronomers,  there are roughly 500 billion galaxies in the known universe, which means there are around 50,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (5×1022) habitable planets. That’s of course if there’s just ONE universe.

In fact, just inside our own Milky Way Galaxy experts now believe are some 400 BILLION STARS, but this number may seem small as some astrophysicists believe that stars in our galaxy could figure the TRILLION. This means that the Milky Way alone could be home to more than 100 BILLION planets.


However, since astronomers aren’t able to see our galaxy from the outside, they can’t really know for sure the number of planets the Milky Way is home to. They can only provide estimates.

To do this, experts calculate our galaxy’s mass and calculate how much of that mass is composed of stars. Based on these calculations scientists believe our galaxy is home to at least 400 billion stars, but as I mentioned above, this number could drastically rise.


There are some calculations which suggest that the Milky Way is home on an average between 800 billion and 3.2 trillion planets, but there are some experts who believe the number could be as high as eight trillion.


Furthermore, if we take a look at what NASA has to say, well find out how the space agency believes there are at least 1,500 planets located within 50 light years from Earth. These conclusions are based on observations taken over a period of six years by the PLANET—Probing Lensing Anomalies NETwork—collaboration, founded in 1995. The study concluded that there are way more Earth-sized planets than Jupiter-sized worlds.

In 2013, Dr. Phil Yock, from the department of physics at the University of Auckland said how: “Kepler finds Earth-sized planets that are quite close to their host stars, and astronomers estimate that there are around 17 billion such planets in the Milky Way. 


These worlds are hotter than our planet, although some could be of a comparable temperature (and could, therefore, be habitable) if they are orbiting a cool star called a red dwarf.”

“Our proposal is to measure the number of Earth-mass planets orbiting stars at distances typically twice the Sun-Earth distance. Our planets will, therefore, be cooler than the Earth. By interpolating between the Kepler and MOA results, we should obtain a good estimate of the number of Earth-like, habitable planets in the Milky Way. We predict a number in the order of 100 billion. Of course, it will be a long way from measuring this number to actually finding inhabited planets, but it will be a step along the way.”

The number seems to be increasing every year, which is kinda cool.


If we take a peek at the recent data provided by the Kepler space mission, we’ll find how astronomers believe approximately 40 BILLION Earth-sized planets orbiting habitable zones of Sun-like stars and red dwarfs in the Milky Way galaxy alone.


Since NASA’s Kepler was launched in 2009, the space telescope has discovered a total of 4,034 potential alien planets, of which 2,335 are verified exoplanets. Interestingly, some astronomers say that around 11 billion planets may be orbiting Sun-like Stars, while other believe this number is more like 100 billion.

In 2017 NASA made great progress in the search for alien planets. Their most noteworthy discovery was the solar system Trappist-1, home to SEVEN Earth-like planets who may even be home to alien life. This particular solar system is very important.



In June of 2017, NASA revealed a statement saying that they had discovered ten new planets outside of our solar system that are very likely of similar size and temperature as Earth and may even have life developed on their surface.


Source

Comments

  1. As Commander Bowman once said, "My God! It's full of stars!"

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    1. Yes, and let us for the time being, and tghe next three milleniua, look up at the night sky and enjoy the splendour of distant and out of reach things.

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  2. This article published on July 2015 by Washington Post

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    1. Uhhh...wtf? Where did you find your information

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    2. I think they're referring to this article that is on the same topic, but not at all the same: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2015/07/24/nasa-estimates-1-billion-earths-in-our-galaxy-alone/?utm_term=.cdc3cbc8504e

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    3. start counting Amalie...

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  3. The term habitable zone means nothing without mentioning hundreds of critical biological "intervals of life", moreover intellectual life, within the zone. Astronomers may predict anything, but biologists must bring their objections, which are billions and trillions times more informative and stricter.
    I understand that possibility of the alien life easies the crazy idea of destroying our planet. But as Homo Sapiens, we have to accept our uniqueness, in order to survive this difficult for the humanity, times.

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    1. Well, yes, another set of additional requirements, but actually not 'billions and trillions times more [strict].' And it bears noting that such 'requirements' are often set based on a subset of potential criteria, which would allow our own 'local' earth-like forms of life to flourish -- a broader set may still allow for other potentially viable forms of life. Still, the poster's point that all this is faaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaar into the future, if we are able to capitalize upon it at all, should be well-taken. Too many fools have a vague (incorrect) impression that extra-terrestrial habitation is an 'out' for us in a near enough term to render environmental protections unnecessary.

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  4. Somehow I don't believe a word from this article, except maybe... no, actually, not a word.

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    1. Not even "the"? That's harsh.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  5. So if there's all this potential for habitable planets, why haven't we found evidence of other intelligent species in the galaxy????????

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    1. Still looking for the first intelligent species.

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    2. In a word - DISTANCE. Assuming that the nearest one was the closest one, you still have a 4+ year message delay at the speed of light, and that assumes that you would even recognize the attempt to communicate with you. They might not even know we're here and be sending the message attempt somewhere else. And when you neighbor is say 100+ light years away, we wouldn't have even been able to see the smoke signals if they tried to communicate with us back in say the 1800's.

      Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. Even today, we might not even realize we're sitting in the middle of an intergalactic telephone exchange because we're looking for the wrong things.

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    3. ....Intelligent enough to keep their distance. C'mon, wouldn't you?! Observe from a distance...not to close or the violent creatures will shoot you out of the sky. And if you survive, God awful things may be done to you! Sound vaguely familiar?!

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    4. Not to mention that given the 14 billion years or so proposed as the current age of our universe (as far as has been roughly theorized thus far, at least), then one has to calculate in the vast time required for some comparable form of evolution to occur in other environments, the probabilities of that process resulting in the development of intelligence, specifically; and then the possibilities of more advanced scientific achievement that might actually permit 'discovery' to occur (as 'Unknown' points out). It may be that other civilizations, presuming they exist, may be little further along than our own, thus far.

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    5. Maybe because this is a quarantine planet ..makes sense seeing as all the death and chaos and mad shit that goes on here..maybe this is where evil is kept and transmuted to good?

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  6. This is very good news. I've had visions of this 3-earth race ideal + angels galore. Evolution and positive change is everything to our survival. That and I want to have a baby with Joanna Newsom. So we can raise the next best young man with every talent and skill. Although it's up to God. Oops! A plenty just hit my window. Psst: "Googleplex"

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    1. Stephanie, check this out... you can start anywhere in the film.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=QvKlP7hEo-Q

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  7. The more planets there are the less chance of intelligent life since we have not heard a sound, or mass extinction of intelligent beings is the norm in the universe.

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    1. That's a paradoxical fallacy. Given even a infinitesimal chance that there is another world where intelligent life can emerge, the larger number of planets means the more likely it will be true.

      Again absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. We have no idea what we really should be looking for, only the most primitive ways of checking if it's even there, and considering the shear distance involved, we haven't even been looking very long.

      You've reached a conclusion that is equivalent to saying there is no sound in the world, not realizing that you're actually deaf.

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  8. The sidereal distances will be the great problem of space communications. I recommend reading "Mission Jupiter Europe - Project Poseidon" ..

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  9. IMHO, it's a mistake on our part to look for life that has some resemblance to humans. The universe could be teeming with life and consciousness, but not in a form that we recognize in our primitive state of evolution.

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  10. It's not so much about finding life, but more about finding planets we could live on.

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  11. is that first picture a still from transformers 3?

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  12. Just look at the vastness and rich variety of life right here first on this one planet we call Earth, and the rest should become clear.

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  13. https://therearenoaliens.blogspot.gr/

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  14. I actually dont believe that there will be many planets like earth around the galaxy. Fact is that life on earth arose as a unique confluence of events occured. Anyone thing could have prevented life from evolving or lasting long enough for signficant human evolution to occur. The position and size of the other planets was also critical especially Jupiter. The age of the sun and its particular brilliance was another factor. In actuality therefore there is very little probabilty that an earth like planet would exist within 1000 lights of earth. As such its not awfully important to us that one may exist say 1000-10000 lights years from us. We may one day travel to the nearer stars but finding a planet which is suitably habitable for us delicate humans will remain elusive for many eons. One day, perhaps, it may be possible for us to go those sort of distances but by then we will be more god than man.

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  15. Old news already. This information was already recorded way 6,000 years ago
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=QvKlP7hEo-Q

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  16. Hopefully one day we will be able to send a craft to the outside of the (galaxy ?) to get images of what we think it may look like.

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    1. We are 27000 light years from the edge of the milky way. If we can send a craft at the speed of light it will take 27000 years to get to the edge. Then it will take another 27000 years to send the picture to us. It is unlikely that anyone will remember sending the craft in the first place.

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  17. Maybe every planet reaches the point where Humans appear, and then they cause enough destruction to make it uninhabitable. The number on Earth is 4.5 Billion years.

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  18. It is very probable that we are a young planet, and other planets are far more advanced than us and have visited.

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  19. What is the equation for life?

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  20. Clickbait covers any item that may be of interest to any party, be it fact or fiction.

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